Tea

Herbs

Catnip   |   Chamomile   |   Dandelion   |   Lavender   |   Lemon Balm   |   Marshmallow   |   Mugwort   |   Mullein   |   Nettle   |   Oregano

Tea

CalmaTé
Calming chamomile, lemon balm and the incredible nutrient density of nettles create a tea that helps bring your body and mind in alignment with contentment, nourishment, and rest.

 

Loose/Bagged



Feel Good Tea

Half Tulsi, half Stinging Nettles and perfectly balanced tea for daily drinking. This duo has tons of magensium, iron, calcium, vitamin A and more.

Loose/Bagged



Lung Support Tea

Mullein flowers, Holy Basil and Elecampane Root, all three support the lungs in different ways, helping to soothe coughs, open airways and clear congestion. Mullein especially has been revered by many cultures for its ability to aid the lungs (and circulatory system in general) by reducing inflammation.

 

Loose/Bagged



Medicine Tea

Chamomile, Lemon and Garlic.All three herbs in this tea are anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and anti-viral, making this our favorite way to stave off illness. After being exposed or at the first sign of feeling ill my family and I sip this tea with a little bit of raw honey.

 

Loose/Bagged



South Jersey Summer Blossom

As spring gives way to summer the heady smell of blossoming fruit trees, flowers, and more often stops us in our steps. Where is that coming from – that lovely smell! In this tea, elderflowers, honeysuckle, red clover and betony capture the color and scent of summer. Enjoy iced or warm.

 

Loose/Bagged



Sweetmint Tea
Red clover, mint and nettles make this tea vitamin-rich, immune boosting, and refreshing!


Loose/Bagged




Herbs

Catnip

Traditionally used to calm nervousness or butterflies in the stomach, catnip tea is also a fine aid for feverish and fussy babies. Safe for kitty and human consumption.

See more catnip products.

 

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Chamomile
Chamomile is a perfect herb, with powerful anti-inflammatory properties across a multitude of symptoms while being gentle enough for babies.


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Dandelion
An herb with ancient and modern uses and found abundantly across continents. Choose from the root, typically used for tinctures, or leaves and flowers for tea.


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Lavender

Timeless lavender was used by the Romans extensively due to it’s pleasing aroma and antibacterial properties. 

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Lemon Balm

 A lovely, refreshing lemon which makes a lovely tea on its own, or as the base for a blend.

 

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Marshmallow
 Choose from root or leaf. Roots are traditionally given to teething babies, and the leaf helps reduce internal inflammation as a tea, or externally as a poultice.


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Mugwort

This undervalued herb can be found growing vigorously, anywhere, and was taught to me as a “placeholder” herb – allowed to grow in places where we had yet to plant something more permanent. Still, since I spent so much time pulling it, I had to find out more about it, and it turns out mugwort has a history of uses from tired feet to lucid dreaming. From smudges to eye pillows, as a tea, or even smoked as an alternative to tobacco!

 

 

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Mullein

Use as tea, or inhale the steam to help relieve discomfort associated with respiratory ailments. Mullein has been used in many cultures for asthmatics and has found favor among folks with COPD.

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Nettle

Nutritious, mild tasting and beneficial for bringing the body back into a nourished, stress-free state. Noted for its impact during allergy season, and for people suffering from the pain of arthritis.

 

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Oregano
Our favorite cooking herb is also a powerful antibacterial herb. Many extol the virtues of oregano oil, which is great for knocking out localized infections, but i prefer the milder approach of including A LOT of the herb in our diet, and in teas as needed. It’s one of my favorite plants growing in the garden too, hardy, abundant, and its tiny flowers are a favorite of the smaller native pollinators.


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